Teachers share their own childhood dreams of jobs

Branden Alford, Opinion Editor

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by Branden Alford One thing we as students often forget about is the fact that teachers were children, too, sharing the same type of goals and dream jobs that we do. Many BHS faculty members had plans different then what they wound up doing, a very interesting finding. Stacy Reed, principal, is a prime example of this. In college, Mr. Reed actually wanted to be a private investigator. From there, he became very interested in law, and that led into teaching government and his role in the school administration. Mark Engel, science teacher, also chose a career close to his dreams as a child. Mr. Engel wanted to work for NASA as an astronaut. Instead of orbiting planets, Mr. Engel teaches students about orbiting electrons and the other joys of Mount Chemistry. One other staff member, Sandy Loucks English teacher, wanted to become a coach in everything. She said, “I went to a big school so I didn’t even know the guidance counselor. No one bothered to tell me that you can’t major in coaching…” Now, she is the best newspaper coach in the entire state. English teacher Devra Parker grew up wanting to be either a nurse or a TV news broadcaster. She would have done an amazing job, seeing as her skills as a loving teacher there to patch together writing skills and in her expressive teaching style are now present. “As a child, I wanted to be either a movie star or a teacher. I cared too much for kids so teaching won out,” said math teacher Dana Hess. Chris Varvel, social studies teacher, said, “Whenever people asked me what I wanted to be when I grew up, I would always answer TV fishing show host or professional football player.” He may not catch fish professionally, but he sure has caught student’s attention. Last but most certainly not least, Donna Bolen, guidance counselor, grew up wanting to be a teacher, even playing school whenever she could. This explains why she is the best guidance counselor in the entire state of Kansas. Many of the faculty members in this building dreamed of doing things different then their job now. This being said, one common sentiment found by this reporter was that everyone loved their job, even though it was not their first pick.

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